Monday, February 28, 2011

ARLENE SARDINE







Daniel Pinkwater loves this book. He reads the whole story and then talks about it. Listen here!



Um... I'm glad he likes a good suicide story. I've always been puzzled by this book. Puzzled and FASCINATED. I have to run out the door but more talk on this later! But listen to this story and check it out. Then we can "discuss." Or I'll discuss and you can read....

4 comments:

alvina said...

I thought this line from the PW review was an interesting take: "Raschka delivers an uplifting message that death is a regenerative part of the life cycle." I remember hearing a lot about this book when it came out, but can't recall if I actually read it myself. I was curious as to what Chris Raschka's intention for the book was, and found this article: http://www.bookpage.com/books-5526-Arlene+Sardine

Interesting. As Harold Underdown pointed out on Facebook, it's a bit of a shame that Daniel Pinkwater is promoting a book that we believe is now out of print. Perhaps he wants to publisher to bring it back? Would be nice to promote some of the little-known newer books...

Grace Lin said...

I was working at a bookstore when this book first came out. I think Chris Raschka is an amazing book creator, but I remember thinking (with great envy) that any aspiring author/illustrator would never have even gotten that idea a second look in a slush pile. But I'm pretty sure that was sour grapes.

I do think it's kind of an odd book though.

christine tripp said...

What an awful idea for a book, honestly, if the author wasn't know, it would not have been published.
The art is also not appealing. I would be surprised if a decent numbers of the book sold (and why and to whom?)

Anonymous said...

From Daniel Pinkwater --

The purpose of the segment on the radio program is to present excellent children's books for the edification and entertainment of the listeners. I've presented books I know to be out of print or relatively unavailable because they are worthwhile and I want to share them. Of course I'm happy if an in-print book gets a sales bump--but it's not my primary concern. Arlene Sardine is a fine picture book, with superior art--it tells a fascinating story of how a food item found on many tables comes to exist. The idea that there's something wrong with making reference to the fact that the sardines we eat and enjoy were once alive suggests a certain disrespect for the intelligence and natural curiosity of children.